Digital Citizenship Reflection #3-Copyright Laws

This week, I have learned so much! I had a very general knowledge base of copyright laws. I had no idea that is so vast and include so many components. At the beginning of my learning and research, I was extremely confused. I am still confused on some of the components such as Creative Commons. There is so much literature out there, it is hard to digest.

So, what did I digest this week? I had never heard of “fair use”. It seems educators are protected with the content they choose to use in lessons and lectures but simultaneously solicited for content use. Educators depend on supplemental materials accompany lessons to give them purpose, engagement, and depth. We need to be aware of such materials and ensure we abide by copyright laws. I am so guilty of violating many aspects of copyright laws. I have ascertained, there are four factors that should be considering when determining if material used falls under “fair use”.  According to Stanford (2018), the four factors include,

  • the purpose and character of your use
  • the nature of the copyrighted work
  • the amount and substantiality of the portion taken, and
  • the effect of the use upon the potential market.

The first factor includes whether or not your work is transformative. This means is the content you are using will be used to enhance or add meaning to your original thought or idea. I believe educators hang in this realm of transformation. This is because we use information to provide facts to enhance learning. One of the greatest lessons I learned this week was about movies in the classroom. Who hasn’t watched a movie in class before. I didn’t realize that movies cannot be viewed in the classroom unless it is directly related to content being taught. Teachers are unequivocally guilty of this practice. I know I am! I have shown movies while I was a teacher during class parties as reward. This is a direct violation of copyright laws. When showing movies in class for reward purposes, permission should be acquired.

I realize at the beginning of this reflection, I stated was still confused about Creative Commons, I am, however I did discover there are numerous distinctive licenses that can be obtained. They type of license attached to the content determines how it can be used. I presume I am still unclear on why one would choose one license over the other or which one is best.

I have used images and literature without providing proper attribution over the course of my many years as an educator. I had heard the term, public domain, but was oblivious of its meaning. It is refreshing to know that I did somewhat abide by some laws! Images and literature provided by the government are part of the public domain and are subject to copyright laws.

The knowledge learned this week is quite overwhelming. To think I have violated laws is a little unsettling. I am not sure who said it, but my mom always told me, “If you know better, you do better.” This is definitely true when it comes to copyright laws. Because it so easy to violate laws you may not be aware of, I have listed some resources to help understand copyright law and its components.

Fair Use

https://fairuse.stanford.edu/overview/fair-use/four-factors/#the_transformative_factor_the_purpose_and_character_of_your_use

Copyright Basics

https://www.csusa.org/page/Basics

https://www.lib.purdue.edu/uco/CopyrightBasics/basics.html

Creative Commons

https://creativecommons.org

This is just a few resources. Don’t be afraid to dive in. There are so many videos, literature, and websites available to better help understand about copyright. I know I am far from understanding the vastness of this topic!

References:

Stim, R., & Stim, R. (2017, April 10). Measuring fair use: the four factors. Retrieved December 8, 2018, from https://fairuse.stanford.edu/overview/fair-use/four-factors/#the_transformative_factor_the_purpose_and_character_of_your_use

Digital Citizenship Reflection #2

Just when I think I have a good understanding of technology and the many facets, I am hit with new learning. This I am grateful for. This week, my learning was quite vast. I know how dependent I am with technology and how many others are just as thirty and ravenous for it. I was also aware of how important a positive digital footprint is and how it can greatly affect your life, whether personal or business. What was completely new information to me was net neutrality. This was a completely new term to me and I became instantaneously intrigued by the concept. 

Being someone who doesn’t partake in news daily, I am aware that many life-changing and important issues have the opportunity to pass me by. Net neutrality is one of those things. Net neutrality is not a new conversation at all. Wikipedia (2018) defines net neutrality as the principle that Internet service providers treat all data on the Internet equally, and not discriminate or charge differently by user, content, website, platform, application, type of attached equipment, or method of communication.  Reardon (2015) sums it up by saying, net neutrality is the idea that all traffic on the Internet should be treated equally. I was so oblivious that my use of the internet as I know could possibly be in jeopardy. Learning about net neutrality revealed to me that I needed to pay more attention to what is going on in the world and not take for granted what I viewed as a basic right. I would have never imagined that Internet providers wanted to control our access to the internet. I also would have never imagined that the government, the FCC conducted precedings over these desires. In 2015, the FCC passed laws prohibiting ISPs to charge extra for speed or block legal content. However, in 2017, there was a vote that repealed the regulations that were put in place. Reardon (2017) suggests, “Without FCC rules and oversight, broadband companies, at least in theory, could limit, restrict or manipulate the types of services and voices you experience online.” ISPs have committed to not limit or restrict services, but the point is they could if they so choose. 

As I continued my research into net neutrality and reading an article by McMahon (2018), I learned that this could have a major impact on education. I was amazed to learn that allowing ISP’s to control internet speed and cost could potentially stunt the growth of students learning online as well as technological innovations, was jaw dropping. Education has made tremendous strides with technology with many schools now having the capability of one to one devices and totally online programs. 

Supporters of net neutrality argue it’s about freedom of speech, I agree. My eyes are now clearly open about net neutrality. The more I dig, the more information I find. Cnet has several articles about net neutrality. I intend to read and learn more as well as keep up with the changes that may come from this appeal. I can’t take for granted my access to the internet. 

References: 

McMahon, W. (2018, January 29). 4 Ways the Net Neutrality Repeal Could Impact K-12 Education. Retrieved December 1, 2018, from https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2018/01/4-ways-net-neutrality-repeal-could-impact-k-12-education

Net neutrality. (2018, November 29). Retrieved December 1, 2018, from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Net_neutrality

Reardon, M. (2017, December 14). What you need to know about the FCC’s net neutrality repeal. Retrieved December 1, 2018, from https://www.cnet.com/news/fcc-net-neutrality-repeal-ajit-pai-what-you-need-to-know/

Smartphones and Digital Citizenship

Below is a video that I created using PowToons. This was the first time that I have created an animated video. This was a challenge when I first started, however, once I figured it out, it became a little easier to navigate. I am sure that I just scratched the surface of creating animated videos, but I am proud of my little feat. I hope you enjoy my creation. This video is about the effect of smartphones and digital citizenship.

Digital Citizenship-Reflection#1

Week one for Digital Citizenship was eye-opening. I didn’t know there was a such thing as digital citizenship or that there is so much information out there. Digital citizenship is a necessary component for everyone, especially students to know and understand who engage in the digital, virtual world.

Ribble discusses the nine elements of digital citizenship in his book: Digital Citizenship in Schools as well as on his website-http://www.digitalcitizenship.net. I thought it was interesting that Ribble categorized technology users into two groups: “digital natives” and “digital immigrants”. These are such interesting terms and pretty accurate categories. Digital natives are individuals who have been born into technology and use it in their everyday lives. Digital immigrants are individuals who have to learn how to use technology. Ribble discusses, “digital citizenship is not a new concept in the field of digital technologies.” As I read on in the book, I understood what he was conveying. It is about the social norms and ways to behave appropriately when using technology. The internet is by far not the first technology. It is however, the technology that is heavily relied upon and used across the world for a plethora of means. Ohler’s article speaks volumes when it comes to digital citizenship. He asked the question, should students live two lives or one? When I first began reading the article, I thought to myself, what is he referring to? As I read on, I thought, “Wow!” Students should definitely live one life. Students need to be taught the importance of behaving appropriately online at school as well as at home. I think it is unrealistic and unpreparing to have kids totally unplug at school. Schools should have the responsibility of teaching students how to behave appropriately online and why it is important. Most schools have Acceptable Use Policies as Ribble discussed, however they fail to create curricula that help students understand acceptable behavior and norms. I know at my school we have an AUP, however we don’t teach students about acceptable behavior online and why it’s important. I believe there are many people out there who feel these norms are common sense and don’t see the need or importance of teaching such curricula. This is a terrible assumption to have, and I will admit, I was in that bunch until reading the materials from this week. Ribble (2015) said it best, “Technology leaders should not assume that their policy, simply because it is in place, is helping students.” Cyberbullying, illegal content, scams, and other inappropriate behaviors are not going anywhere anytime soon. We can help our students recognize these things and how to stay away from them.

With digital citizenship, that is the focus, helping students. The development of the nine elements was created to help schools help students. The nine elements are a proactive approach versus a reactive approach. Students can be susceptible to many behaviors in the virtual world if not taught how to avoid, respond, or act appropriately online. The digital world is full of awaiting opportunities from sharing information, research, commerce, and so on. It is our responsibility to make sure those opportunities are reached in a safe manner. Now that I am aware of the importance of digital citizenship, it is my responsibility to bring this knowledge to my school and our students.

Here are some resources to better understand digital citizenship:

  1. http://www.digitalcitizenship.netMike Ribble’s website really delves into what it means to be a digital citizen. There is a page dedicated to the nine elements.
  2. iste.org and search the tag digital citizenship. There are some great articles listed that discuss how teachers are teaching digital citizenship. There are also articles about students becoming successful digital citizens.
  3. Youtube-searching digital citizenship. There are so many videos out there about digital citizenship. This would give them an opportunity to see it action.
  4. https://www.commonsense.org/education/digital-citizenshipThis is a phenomenal website with a plethora of information about digital citizenship. This website also has free lessons for each grade level about digital citizenship.
  5. Brainpop.comSince our school already has a subscription to brainpop, this would be a great resource for teachers. I know brainpop is supposed to be for students, however I have found that I am able to learn a lot from the videos as well.

References: 

Ohler, J. (2012). Digital citizenship means character education for the digital age. Education Digest: Essential Readings Condensed for Quick Review

Ribble, M. (2015). Digital citizenship in schools: Nine elements all students should know. Eugene, OR: International     Society for Technology in Education

Blended Learning-Our Future

Blended Learning is a trending learning model to help students succeed in their learning.  Today, as educators we are tasked with engaging the 21st century learner. Direct instruction and lectures are not enough. We don’t get rid of those traditional models, we enhance them with technology and other tools that we now have access to. I have ascertained that LEARNING is the primary focus for students. There are many tools out there to help meet this goal. Dr. H has drilled this concept and I think I finally got it! 🙂 Thank you! Check out this short video to peak your interest!

I am proposing some pretty innovative concepts for my school. I believe these models will be extremely beneficial to our students, parents, and teachers. I hope you enjoy reading this proposal.

Image 10-28-18 at 7.40 PM

Because I really believe in this proposed project and this is something that I want to see happen at my school, I really dove into researching supporting articles for the Flipped Classroom and Station Rotation. These are concepts that our school has been interested in for awhile, but had’t had success in follow through. My goal is to make sure this project is carried out and given time to be successful. Click on the image below to experience my Literature Review. The information provided in the review is a mere piece of the supporting information for Blended Learning. Enjoy!!!!

book shelves book stack bookcase books
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

Of course with any project, there must be a plan to follow to get the ball rolling in the right direction. Planning must be thorough and include steps to monitor goals and adjust if necessary. With all that said, we must keep our eye on the target, which is student learning. Of course there will be hiccups and readjustments, but a well thought out plan will have room for growing pains. Check out my plan to implement the Flipped Classroom, Station Rotation, and Individualized Homework. Implementation Plan-Final


NEXT STEPS…..

abstract antique architectural design architecture

Once I began researching, I felt like I couldn’t stop. I am amazed at how much information is out there about blended learning and the insane results that are being generated. My goal is to be a resource to my campus as we implement this project. How can I do this? This is only possible by keeping myself knowledgeable of the vast amounts of information that is available at my fingertips, whether it is from videos online or more literature.

Here are some more videos about blended learning and how elementary schools are currently using the flipped classroom and station rotation.

This video focuses on the why and how of the flipped classroom model.

This video shows you how the flipped classroom has worked in an elementary school.

Another model of blended learning, focusing on station rotation.

I like to learn from others, there is so much research out there about blended learning. I am learning that this is really not as new of a concept as I originally thought. Here are some books that I plan to read or listen to the audiobook if available. I have become a audiobook fanatic!

Blended Learning in Action: A Practical Guide Toward Sustainable Change

I am really intrigued about this book. Tucker is also featured in the youtube video about blended learning above. She discusses the station rotation model. This book focuses on increasing student engagement through the use of blended learning, using technology as a tool.  

 

 

 

 

Getting Smart: How Digital Learning is Changing the World– October 18, 2011

Who doesn’t want to get smarter? Ark discusses why students should be exposed to digital learning. This is where our world is headed. We need to be on the side of preparing our students for the future. It appears he shares stories of success as well. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Just Ask Us: Kids Speak Out on Student Engagement (Corwin Teaching Essentials) 1st Edition

What better way to find out what students expect in school! This book is full of student quotes and what they want in a learning environment. It will be interesting to see the different perspectives of the many students surveyed. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


group of people raising right hand
Photo by rawpixel.com on Pexels.com

Professional Developments I would like to experience:

ISTE 2019: https://conference.iste.org/2019/ 

JUNE 23-26, 2019: This conference seems like a digital educator dream. ISTE is responsible for digital learning standards and is a great resource in the digital education world.

Blended and Personalized Learning Conference: https://blendedlearningconference.com

APRIL 4-6, 2019: An entire conference on blended learning! This would be a great opportunity for the pilot teachers of the blended learning program to get some valuable information and exposure to how blended learning is working across the nation.


We have the ability to truly engage our students with authentic learning experiences. Keeping our focus on student learning will greatly benefit all stakeholders involved. We want to be able to plant in students the capability of true problem solving and critical thinking. We also want to prepare them for the future. Technology or school are not going anywhere anytime in the foreseeable future. Let’s use these two tools to increase student learning! 

 

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

 

Implementation Plan-Final

Step One-Plan with everyone in mind

  1. Form a committee and present proposal to help support stakeholder buy in
  2. Survey Teachers on comfortability with instruction online
  3. Survey Parents to identify their technology capabilities at home-internet and devices available.
  4. Committee will review and analyze results from surveys.

Step Two-Investigate Platforms for Station Rotation, Flipped Classroom, and Individualized Homework

  1. Committee will review current online platforms teachers have access to that are part of curriculum subscriptions.
  2. Review these platforms capability of meeting the requirements of the blended learning program.
  3. Investigate other platforms such as Istation, IXL, and Reasoning Minds
    1. Grade levels served
    2. Device compatibility
    3. Cost

Step Three-Present findings to Principal and Business Manager

  1. Committee will discuss the platforms we are proposing to use.
    1. Benefits
    2. Case Studies
    3. Cost, if any

Step Four-Create presentation for teachers

  1. Presentation will include benefits of blending learning.
  2. Demonstrate the use of the selected platforms.
  3. Presentation will feature a Q&A session.
  4. Evaluation tool of presentation from teachers.

Step Five-Parent and Community Meeting

  1. A parent meeting will be conducted to inform them of the blended learning program.
  2. Benefits will be discussed as well as prospective results.
  3. Q&A session will be held during parent meeting.

Step Six- Choose Pilot Grade Levels

  1. STAAR testing grades will pilot the program in Math and Reading.

Step Seven-Begin Program

  1. Students will take assessments to determine individualized paths.
  2. Begin Station Rotation in Daily and Friday RTI time.
  3. Use platform to assign student instruction via videos.
  4. Students and teachers will recieve instantaneous feedback on progress.

Step Eight-Monitor and Differentiate

  1. Monitor student progress from individualized reports.
  2. Assist teachers with differentiating instructional activities.
  3. Assess students with bi-weekly CBA’s.
  4. Meet with students to assess their feedback and the feedback they have received from the individualized learning reports.

Step Nine-Support and Collaboration

  1. Meet with pilot teachers weekly to receive feedback on the program.
  2. Set aside time for pilot teachers to meet weekly to support each other.

Step Ten-Observations and Collaboration

  1. Set-up classroom observations for teachers not in the pilot.
  2. Teachers will have the opportunity to observe how the program works.
  3. Set-up collaboration meetings so pilot and non-pilot teachers have an opportunity to discuss pros and concerns of the program. This will be an opportunity for non-pilot teachers for questions and answers.

Step Eleven-Report

  1. Send home bi-weekly progress reports from individualized learning reports.
  2. Report findings to Principal.
  3. Report findings to Committee.

Step Twelve-Analyze, Review, and Update

  1. Surveys will be issued to pilot teachers, students, and parents.
  2. Surveys will target feedback for ease of program, student progress, as well as open ended questions for other comments or concerns.
  3. Results from surveys will reviewed by the committee and the Principal to make necessary changes for the upcoming school year.

Blended Learning Implementation Draft

I look forward to your comments and suggestions. This is a very rough draft of what I was thinking.

sharpened blue wooden pencil
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

Implementation Draft

Step One-Plan with everyone in mind

  1. Form a committee and present proposal to help support stakeholder buy in
  2. Survey Teachers on comfortability with instruction online
  3. Survey Parents to identify their technology capabilities at home-internet and devices available.
  4. Committee will review and analyze results from surveys.

Step Two-Investigate Platforms for Station Rotation, Flipped Classroom, and Individualized Homework

  1. Committee will review current online platforms teachers have access to that are part of curriculum subscriptions.
  2. Review these platforms capability of meeting the requirements of the blended learning program.
  3. Investigate other platforms such as Istation, IXL, and Reasoning Minds
    1. Grade levels served
    2. Device compatibility
    3. Cost

Step Three-Present findings to Principal and Business Manager

  1. Committee will discuss the platforms we are proposing to use.
    1. Benefits
    2. Case Studies
    3. Cost, if any

Step Four-Create presentation for teachers

  1. Presentation will include benefits of blending learning.
  2. Demonstrate the use of the selected platforms.
  3. Presentation will feature a Q&A session.
  4. Evaluation tool of presentation from teachers.

Step Five-Parent and Community Meeting

  1. A parent meeting will be conducted to inform them of the blended learning program.
  2. Benefits will be discussed as well as prospective results.
  3. Q&A session will be held during parent meeting.

Step Six- Choose Pilot Grade Levels

  1. STAAR testing grades will pilot the program in Math and Reading.

Step Seven-Begin Program

  1. Students will take assessments to determine individualized paths.
  2. Begin Station Rotation in Daily and Friday RTI time.
  3. Use platform to assign student instruction via videos.

Step Eight-Monitor and Differentiate

  1. Monitor student progress from individualized reports.
  2. Assist teachers with differentiating instructional activities.
  3. Assess students with bi-weekly CBA’s.

Step Nine-Report

  1. Send home bi-weekly progress reports from individualized learning reports.
  2. Report findings to Principal.

The Wrap-Up (5303)

text on shelf
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

I am not sure where to begin! This class has really had a dramatic effect on me. I guess that is the point of the class. In our last class, 5302, I was introduced to CSLE and COVA. Now I can truly say, I appreciate these concepts. I feel like I have learned so much in a short period of time. The guidance provided seemed a little challenging initially. Being given a choice in how I demonstrate my learning is priceless. Failing Forward, the book by John C. Maxwell, was not a required read for this class, but it was referenced in either the 1st or 2nd class conference. The ideas that were shared from this book, inspired to me actually read it. I am glad I did. The principles discussed in this book help embrace the COVA model. When I began, I was unsure of how I was going to accomplish creating an Eportfolio, especially because I didn’t know what it was or how it would benefit me. Fast forward a few weeks later, I am constantly thinking about what I can blog about or what I can add to my site.

The connections that have been in this class, I feel are going to be professional collaborators and partners even after we finish this class and program. I only wish other classes focus on collaboration and networking, I believe this component made all the difference. We were able to share thoughts, fears, give advice, and just be an ear to each other. We were also encouraged to give each other meaningful feedback, this was quite beneficial. Reviewing other Eportfolios gives me inspiration and new ideas.

There are things in my Eportfolio that still need fine tuning. I am still trying to figure out how to add tags and I just learned that I don’t have the capability to add videos directly from a file. In order for me to add a video, I have to upload it to YouTube and then share it to my page. Not sure how I feel about that yet.

I have designed and established a place that belongs to me where I can share, document my learning, and revisit ideas. This is definitely just the beginning!

Failing Forward

This is a phenomenal overview of the principals shared by John C. Maxwell in his book Failing Forward. I recently finished listening to the audiobook and was blown away. Maxwell shares some fundamental ideas of overcoming your fear of failure. I relished in the stories of well known individuals and their journeys to success. One of the most significant ideas I took away was to separate yourself from the act of the failure. You are not a failure, but failed at something. I truly believe people have a difficult time separating the two. If you have not read the book, I admonish you to either read it or listen to the audiobook. It is quite eye opening. Until then, enjoy the overview of the 15 steps to overcoming failure.

References

Mental Reach. (2016, January 31). Overcoming Your Fear | Failing Forward Animation Notes. Retrieved September 26, 2018, from https://youtu.be/htk6DQKzN0w